Too Fast To Live, Too Young To Die

So another post that people tend to look at is this one about our good friend Edward Colver.  The Professor works with him so I've had the pleasure of spending a few nights around his pool table in the garage.  Hanging out with Colver will either keep you from getting high or make it your life pursuit.  He once lived with ducks who roam freely around the craftsman surrounded by a Nazi memoribilia collection that does not seem wrong at all.  Friday night, some of his photos will be on display in Echo Park.  These are iconic shots of a special time in this city's music history, a time that may never be replicated, but at least we can aspire to.  There are a lot other artist's works being showcased, but Colver could do this one solo.  There's also a real nice musical guest, a band that I would pair with HARASSOR to introduce people to today's LA punk music.  Here are the details (and we agree, the show's name could have used more thought (or less)):   

SUBLIMINAL PROJECTS GALLERY
1331 W Sunset Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90026

Presents Too Fast To Live, Too Young To Die

FEATURING WORK BY EDWARD COLVER, SHEPARD FAIREY, GLEN E. FRIEDMAN, JENNY LENS, DAVE MARKEY, RAYMOND PETTIBON, JORDAN SCHWARTZ, WINSTON SMITH

Original flyers, posters, set lists and more from Bryan Ray Turcotte (Fucked Up + Photocopied)

Opening Reception:

Friday, February 25, 2011 / 7-11PM

Musical Performances at 9PM

Exhibition Dates:

February 25th - March 26, 2011

Curated by Katherine B. Cone and Jon Cournoyer 

TOO FAST TO LIVE, TOO YOUNG TO DIE is a selection of photography, art and ephemera from the California Punk and Hardcore scene with an emphasis on the explosive period of the late 70's and early 80's.  This exhibition features creative pioneers who were present for the detonation of the Southern California scene and whose imagery helped capture and craft it's angles, attitudes, music, fashion and sub-culture.  Additionally, reflections of other punk scenes throughout California and contemporary collaborations will be presented that were inspired by one of the most potent and relevant periods of individual expression in California history.  

And straight from the Edward Colver Foundation, a previously unseen photo of D. Boon and his Minutemen: